The Globe and Mail: 8 articles ahead of The Aga Khan’s visit to Canada

The Globe and Mail: 8 articles ahead of The Aga Khan's visit to Canada

The Globe & Mail, Canada’s national newspaper, covers a story about His Highness the Aga Khan ahead of his address to the Canadian Parliament.

Within this featured story, in the national section of the online version of the newspaper, The Globe and Mail, draws further attention to 7 other important news stories covered since 2010.

For our patrons’ convenience and reading enjoyment, Ismailimail, presents below, excerpts from all 8 of these news articles in addition to the links to the sources.

FEATURED STORY

ppower086-280510The Aga Khan will be in Ottawa on Feb. 27, 2014, to address a joint session of Parliament. (Peter Power/The Globe and Mail)
The Aga Khan will be in Ottawa on Feb. 27, 2014, to address a joint session of Parliament.
(Peter Power/The Globe and Mail)

The Aga Khan: the singular appeal of a pluralist

JANICE GROSS STEIN – Director of the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto.

Special to The Globe and Mail – Published Friday, Feb. 21 2014

This week, the Aga Khan will be in Ottawa to address a joint session of Parliament, a signal honour reserved for a handful of extraordinary people who have a special relationship with Canada.

But what makes the Aga Khan special to Canada? Over the years, he has maintained relationships with a succession of prime ministers of different political stripes, including the current one, who granted him honorary citizenship in 2009 and will welcome him to the House of Commons on Thursday.

… The Canadian bond, though, springs from his dedication to pluralism, something so associated with this country that many Canadians now take it for granted – at their peril.

CONTINUE READING – The Aga Khan: the singular appeal of a pluralist

7 MORE RELATED STORIES

1. Aga Khan wins Royal Architectural Institute of Canada’s highest honour

Aga Khan was awarded the Gold Medal of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada (Peter Power/The Globe and Mail)
Aga Khan was awarded the Gold Medal of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada
(Peter Power/The Globe and Mail)

ALEX BOZIKOVIC – The Globe and Mail – Published Thursday, Nov. 28 2013

How often does a spiritual leader win an award for architecture? The Aga Khan is likely the only candidate: The hereditary imam of the world’s Ismaili Muslims and also a major patron of art, architecture and city building who is making a significant mark in Canada.

At a ceremony in Ottawa on Wednesday he was awarded the Gold Medal of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada.

“In Islam, the role of an Imam is not limited to the domain of faith  … It also includes a deep engagement in the world, in all of the wide and complex issues that affect our quality of life. Among those issues, not many have more impact than architecture and the buildings in which we spend, at all ages, so many days and nights of our lives.”

– His Highness Prince Aga Khan

“The scope of their philanthropic activity is astounding, and much of it uses architecture as a vehicle,”

–  George Baird, distinguished Toronto architect and academic who nominated the Aga Khan for the award.

When Baird visited a series of AKDN projects about a decade ago, he says, “I had never seen anything like it.”

Aga Khan agencies are making a significant impact on Canada’s cities, starting with an Ismaili Centre in Burnaby, B.C., in 1982, and more recently a series of contemporary cultural buildings open to a broad public. First came the Delegation of the Ismaili Imamat in Ottawa (2008), where the ceremony on Wednesday evening was held. The building is a centre for diplomacy and cultural outreach, with a design led by Fumihiko Maki, the Pritzker prize-winning Japanese architect. Located on Sussex Drive, it is a spectacular building that combines allusions to Islamic screens and gardens with Japanese-style craftsmanship in concrete.

The Aga Khan Development Network is also developing a Global Centre for Pluralism in Ottawa.

The biggest project is now nearing completion in Toronto: a complex including a park, an Ismaili Centre and an Aga Khan Museum that will include art and artifacts from 1,000 years of Muslim civilizations, one of the world’s most important museums of its kind. The museum, also designed by Maki, is scheduled to open in the fall of 2014, along with the Ismaili Centre, by Indian architect Charles Correa.

CONTINUE READING – Aga Khan wins Royal Architectural Institute of Canada’s highest honour

2. The dangers of decentralization

HIS HIGHNESS THE AGA KHAN – Contributed to The Globe and Mail – Published Friday, Jan. 27 2012

This is adapted from a speech by His Highness the Aga Khan at the ceremony conferring an honorary doctorate at the University of Ottawa this month.

His Highness the Aga Khan has been awarded an honorary doctorate from the University of Ottawa for his service to humanity during a special Convocation ceremony on Friday, January 13 2012  in the Desmarais Building. (gazetteUO)
His Highness the Aga Khan has been awarded an honorary doctorate from the University of Ottawa for his service to humanity during a special Convocation ceremony on Friday, January 13 2012 in the Desmarais Building. (gazetteUO)

“My interests in the past 50 years as imam of the Ismaili community have been primarily focused on Africa, South Asia, Central Asia and the Middle East – and on improving the quality of life for the people who live there. The more I think about this matter, the more I am convinced that one of the critical barriers to progress is the way in which governing processes occur.There is certainly no straightforward, universal formula to apply in such situations. We must not naively assume that what has worked in some parts of the Western world, for example, will work the same way in less developed contexts. Different places, different histories require quite different approaches.”

– His Highness Prince Aga Khan

CONTINUE READING – HIS HIGHNESS THE AGA KHAN The dangers of decentralization

3. INTERVIEW: The Aga Khan’s world view

Prime Minister Stephen Harper presented His Highness the Aga Khan with a certificate of honourary Canadian citizenship during an event marking the construction of a new Ismaili Centre, the first-ever Aga Khan Museum for Islamic Art and Culture, and the park. (PMO/Jason Ransom)
PM Harper presented HH the Aga Khan honourary Canadian citizenship during an event marking the construction of a new Ismaili Centre, the first-ever Museum for Islamic Art & Culture, & the park. PMO/Jason Ransom

Published Friday, May. 28 2010

The Aga Khan, spiritual leader of the world’s 15 million Ismaili Muslims and renowned philanthropist, spoke to The Globe and Mail Friday in a conversation that ranged from the prospects for Afghanistan to his profound admiration of Canadian pluralism.

The Aga Khan, who traces his ancestry directly to the prophet Muhammad, is seen as one of the Muslim leaders most closely engaged with the West. His foundation carries out development work in areas such as education and health care in Africa and Central Asia.

On the day he received honorary Canadian citizenship, the Aga Khan urged the West to remain in Afghanistan for as long as necessary to achieve stability…

CONTINUE READING – INTERVIEW The Aga Khan’s world view

4. TRANSCRIPT Verbatim: The Aga Khan’s LaFontaine-Baldwin Lecture

The Globe and Mail – Published Friday, Oct. 15 2010

His Highness the Aga Khan delivers the LaFontaine-Baldwin Lecture in Toronto, Canada. His Highness talked about the long history of pluralism, the intensification of these challenges and how best to respond to that challenge. (AKDN / Zahur Ramji)
His Highness the Aga Khan delivers the LaFontaine-Baldwin Lecture in Toronto, Canada. His Highness talked about the long history of pluralism, the intensification of these challenges and how best to respond to that challenge. (AKDN / Zahur Ramji)

“As you may know, my close ties with Canada go back almost four decades, to the time when many thousands of Asian refugees from Uganda, including many Ismailis, were welcomed so generously in this society. These ties have continued through the cooperation of our Aga Khan Development Network (AKDN) with several Canadian Institutions, including the establishment, four years ago, of the Global Centre for Pluralism in Ottawa. I had the opportunity last week to chair a highly productive meeting there of the Centre’s Board of Directors.Earlier this year, we also celebrated here in Toronto the Foundation Ceremony for the Aga Khan Museum and a new Ismaili Centre. So there are powerful chords of memory – from four decades ago, four years ago, and even four months ago, that tie me closely to Canada.

I was also deeply moved by Canada’s extraordinary gift to me of honorary citizenship.

I always have felt at home when I come to Canada – but never more so than in the wake of this honour. And if I ever felt any trepidation about accepting this evening’s invitation, it has been significantly reduced by the fact that I can now claim – however modestly – to be a Canadian!

… Let me conclude by emphasizing once again the urgency of this challenge. We are at a particularly complex moment in human history. The challenges of diversity are frightening for many people, in societies all around the world. But diversity also has the capacity to inspire.

The mission of the Global Centre for Pluralism is to look closely at these challenges – and to think hard about them. This will be demanding work. But as we go forward, we hope we can discern more predictably and preempt more effectively those conditions which lead to conflict among peoples. And we also hope that we can advance those institutions and those mindsets which foster constructive engagement.

The world we seek is not a world where difference is erased, but where difference can be a powerful force for good, helping us to fashion a new sense of co-operation and coherence in our world, and to build together a better life for all.”

– His Highness Prince Aga Khan

CONTINUE READING – TRANSCRIPT Verbatim: The Aga Khan’s LaFontaine-Baldwin Lecture

5. Harper names Aga Khan an honorary citizen

honorary-citizens-of-canada - all 5
HH the Aga Khan among the five in Canada’s history honoured with the Honorary Canadian Citizenship. Aga Khan/Stephen Harper TheIsmaili.org

JOE FRIESEN, Toronto — The Globe and Mail – Published Friday, May. 28 2010

In a grand white tent on the site of a museum to be named in his honour, the Aga Khan formally accepted Canadian citizenship from Prime Minister Stephen Harper Friday.

The Aga Khan, only the fifth person to be awarded honourary citizenship, described it as a generous and gracious gesture as he stood with the Prime Minister before a crowd of dignitaries and several hundred members of the Ismaili community. He joins a list of honourary citizens that includes Nelson Mandela, Aung San Su Kyi and the Dalai Lama, among others.

I have always felt very much at home in Canada, but never more than at this moment

– His Highness Prince Aga Khan

The ceremony was held to mark the laying of the foundation of the Aga Khan Museum, which will hold the Aga Khan’s personal collection of Islamic art, and will be the largest museum of its kind in the English-speaking world. It will also be the site of the new Ismaili Centre of Toronto, as well as a 75,000 square metre park, designed by Vladimir Djurovic. All three will be located on a site in North York that once belonged to the Bata Shoe Company.

“In a world in which some speak of a growing clash of civilizations, we believe the museum will help address what is not so much a clash of civilizations, as it is a clash of ignorances”

– His Highness Prince Aga Khan

CONTINUE READING – Harper names Aga Khan an honorary citizen

6. CITY SPACE Complex backed by Aga Khan will bring new life to urban neighbourhoods

The Ismaili Centre, the Aga Khan Museum and the Char Bag Park connecting the two (Imara (Wynford Drive) Ltd.)
The Ismaili Centre, the Aga Khan Museum and the Char Bag Park connecting the two (Imara (Wynford Drive) Ltd.)

LISA ROCHON – ARCHITECTURE CRITIC – Special to The Globe and Mail – Published Thursday, May. 27 2010

After more than a decade in planning and design, a suite of culturally invigorating projects initiated and financed by the Aga Khan are breaking ground in north Toronto.

Two buildings, the Aga Khan Museum and an Ismaili worship centre, will be knit together by an all-season park featuring allées of birch and ginkgo trees and infinity pools made of black granite, designed in the spirit of the Islamic chahar bagh, a formal garden.

The most public of the buildings on the 6.8-hectare site is the museum, designed by the acclaimed Japanese architect Fumihiko Maki in collaboration with the Toronto firm Moriyama & Teshima Architects.

The Ismaili Centre, designed by renowned Mumbai-based architect Charles Correa, is clad in French limestone and features a double glass roof (sort of what was promised by the Royal Ontario Museum and never delivered by Daniel Libeskind).

“This one is quite an amazing technological achievement … Charles Correa had this vision of the glass roof. The challenge was to make it work on a technical level.”

– Daniel Teramura of Moriyama & Teshima, the partner in charge of the Ismaili Centre.

CONTINUE READING – CITY SPACE Complex backed by Aga Khan will bring new life to urban neighbourhoods

7. PLURALISM Muslim leader seeks to make Canada a model for the world

The new Ismaili Centre being built in Toronto will include the biggest Islamic museum in the English-speaking world. (Imara (Wynford Drive) Ltd.)
The new Ismaili Centre being built in Toronto will include the biggest Islamic museum in the English-speaking world.
(Imara (Wynford Drive) Ltd.)

JOE FRIESEN – DEMOGRAPHICS REPORTER – The Globe and Mail – Published Thursday, May. 27 2010

The Aga Khan, a beloved figure who is both the spiritual guide and secular role model for Canada’s 100,000 Ismailis, is in Toronto on Friday to lay the foundation for an Islamic museum and cultural centre. The construction on Canadian soil of the largest Islamic museum in the English-speaking world marks a significant milestone for a community that arrived here, nearly destitute, 38 years ago. In the last four decades, Ismailis have emerged as a remarkable success story. Their smooth integration is seen as one of the reasons the Aga Khan, a keen admirer of this country, promotes Canadian-style pluralism as a model for the world.

He is also a direct descendant of the Prophet Mohammed and the spiritual leader of 15 million Ismaili Muslims around the globe.

In a short time, Ismailis have become leading figures in politics, business and the professions, with prominent people including Rogers CEO Nadir Mohamed and Senator Mobina Jaffer.

” [The Aga Khan ]… one of the very forward-looking leaders of the Muslim world.”

– Shafique Virani, a professor of Islamic studies at the University of Toronto

CONTINUE READING – PLURALISM Muslim leader seeks to make Canada a model for the world

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s