December 10 marks the United Nation’s Human Rights Day: Prince Sadruddin, Begum Rana Liaquat, Benazir Bhutto, Malala Yusufzai & 4 other Muslims – recipients of the Human Rights Prize

As Malala Yusufzai and Kailash Satyarthi jointly accepted the 2014 Nobel Peace Prize today in Oslo, Norway “for their struggle against the suppression of children and young people and for the right of all children to education,” (1) the date is especially important in it’s historical significance.

For it was on this day, 64 years ago, on December 10th, 1950, that the United Nations (UN) General Assembly proclaimed 10th December as Human Rights Day to celebrate equal rights for all the human being, man, woman and children.

16 years later, in 1966, the resolve was further strengthened by the need to honor commendable leaders and organizations with the UN’s Human Rights Prize who have served humanity in an exemplary and remarkable way. Beginning in 1968 and every 5 years since, the UN has awarded the Human Right Prize to a total of 60 global leaders, 8 of whom were Muslims.

For Malala, December 10th must be doubly special as she was the 2013 UN’s Human Right Prize winner together with 5 other exceptional leaders.

Prince Sadruddin Aga Khan: Two Muslims were awarded with the Human Rights award in the year 1978. Prince Sadaruddin who served as the UN high commissioner for refugees also played a key role in the protection and advocacy of global environment. (Via ARY News)
Prince Sadruddin Aga Khan: Two Muslims were awarded with the Human Rights award in the year 1978. Prince Sadaruddin who served as the UN high commissioner for refugees also played a key role in the protection and advocacy of global environment. (Via ARY News)

The winners of the prestigious United Nations Prize in the Field of Human Rights include 8 Muslims: an Egyptian; an Iranian; a Moroccan; 3 Pakistanis and a Tunisian.

1968: Senator Dr. Mehrangaiz Manouchehrian (Iran) Lawyer
1973: Taha Hussain (Egypt) Literature Professor & Writer
1978: Begum Rana Liaquat (Pakistan) Stateswoman and first female Governor of Pakistan
1978: Prince Sadruddin Aga Khan UN High Commissioner for Refugees
1993: Hassib Ben Ammar (Tunisia) Politician and Human Right Activist
2008: Benazir Bhutto (Pakistan) first female Prime Minister of Pakistan (and of the Muslim World)
2013: Khadija Ryadi (Morocca) Human Rights Activist
2013: Malala Yusufzai (Pakistan) Education Activist & 2014 Nobel Peace Prize Laureate

Discover, Explore an Learn more at ARY News | 8 Muslim figures who received Human Rights Award

(1) Nobel Prize | The Nobel Peace Prize 2014

About the United Nations (UN) Human Rights Prize

The United Nations Prize in the Field of Human Rights is an honorary award given to individuals and organizations in recognition of outstanding achievement in human rights. The Prize was established by the General Assembly in 1966 and was awarded for the first time on 10 December 1968, the twentieth anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The Prize has since been awarded in 1973, 1978, 1988, 1993, 1998, 2003 and 2008.

The Prize is an opportunity not only to give public recognition to the achievements of the recipients themselves, but also to send a clear message to human rights defenders the world over that the international community is grateful for, and supports, their tireless efforts to promote all human rights for all.

Via 2013 United Nations Human Rights Prize


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