Impact & Relevance: University of Central Asia (UCA) – One University, Three Campuses

“By creating intellectual space and resources, the University will bring the power of education and human ingenuity to the economic and social challenges of mountain societies in Central Asia and elsewhere.”

– His Highness Prince Karim Aga Khan
49th hereditary Imam of the Ismaili Muslims
Foundation Stone Ceremony for the UCA – Khorog, Tajikistan – July 6th, 2004

World’s first university dedicated to mountain societies

The University of Central Asia (UCA) was founded in 2000. The Presidents of Tajikistan, the Kyrgyz Republic and Kazakhstan and His Highness the Aga Khan signed the International Treaty and Charter establishing this secular and private University, which was ratified by the respective parliaments and registered with the United Nations
The University of Central Asia (UCA) was founded in 2000. The Presidents of Tajikistan, the Kyrgyz Republic and Kazakhstan and His Highness the Aga Khan signed the International Treaty and Charter establishing this secular and private University, which was ratified by the respective parliaments and registered with the United Nations.

“The University of Central Asia is the first university in the world dedicated exclusively to the study of the problems and potentials of mountains and mountain people.”

– His Highness Prince Karim Aga Khan
49th hereditary Imam of the Ismaili Muslims
Opening Ceremony of the Aga Khan School – Osh, Kyrgyz Republic – October 30th, 2002

Photographs: His Highness the Aga Khan at University of Central Asia’s Naryn Campus

UCA – One University, Three Campuses

University of Central Asia (UCA) and its campuses in Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan.

University of Central Asia (UCA) and its campuses in Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan. University of Central Asia (UCA) and its campuses in Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan. (Image: UCA)

“Imams whether they are Shia or Sunni, they have a duty to serve people.

That is the nature of Imamat and, therefore, in countries where the Ismaili Imamat can bring support and help, that is our duty to do so, and we’re very happy to do so in Central Asia, like we are doing so in the Indian sub-continent, we’re doing so in East Africa; in West Africa.

So it’s part of the mandate of any Imam.

But it’s a big mistake to think that you can do development only for Muslim communities. Many countries have mixed communities and therefore you have to do development for all the people within a given area, whether they are Muslim or Christian or Jewish or Hindu or Sikh.

You have what I would call a civil responsibility.”

– His Highness Prince Karim Aga Khan
49th hereditary Imam of the Ismaili Muslims
Central Asia, 2008

UCA – Perspective from Robert Remington

Research, Insight & Perspective by A. Maherali

All related in this series.

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