Aga Khan at Harvard: Islam and the Cosmopolitan Ethic in a Fragmented World | Huffington Post

Samreen Hooda & Shamez Babvani – November 18, 2015

“He has a very important voice as an ethical leader.

It’s people like him … and others who give us some guidance on how to deal with this question of pluralism and diversity not only in the U.S. but also elsewhere.”

– Michèle Lamont, Director, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs

L to R: His Highness Prince Karim Aga Khan, Ali Asani - Professor of Indo-Muslim Religion and Cultures and the Director of Prince Alwaleed bin Talal Islamic Studies Program at Harvard, Michèle Lamont Director of the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs at Harvard. (image credit: Martha Stewart via Huffington Post)
L to R: His Highness Prince Karim Aga Khan, Ali Asani – Professor of Indo-Muslim Religion and Cultures and the Director of Prince Alwaleed bin Talal Islamic Studies Program at Harvard, Michèle Lamont Director of the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs at Harvard. (image credit: Martha Stewart via Huffington Post)

Today if we were asked: “What is your understanding of Islam,” many of us may look at Friday’s attacks in Paris, for which the self-declared Islamic State claimed responsibility, as a foundation for our answer. Yet, on Thursday evening, a day before these atrocious attacks, a much different tone was set by a man many have described as a quiet, hardworking Muslim leader who has devoted his life to bettering the human condition.

Delivering the honorable Jodidi lecture at Harvard University on Thursday, November 12th, His Highness the Aga Khan, the 49th hereditary Imam of the Shia Imami Ismaili Muslims and a direct descendent of the Prophet Muhammad, urged for a “pluralist, cosmopolitan society,” one which “not only accepts difference, but actively seeks to understand it – and to learn from it.”

So let us too try to understand and learn from the difference between these two voices.

Discover, Explore and Learn more by reading the complete article at Aga Khan at Harvard: Islam and the Cosmopolitan Ethic in a Fragmented World | Huffington Post

 

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