Retrospective: 2005 visit of His Highness Prince Karim Aga Khan to the Norwegian Nobel Institute

Earlier this month and eleven years ago on April 7, 2005, His Highness Prince Karim Aga Khan, 49th hereditary Imam of the Ismaili Muslims, addressed the Nobel Institute on subjects of democratic development, pluralism and civil society. His Highness the Aga Khan was on his first official visit to Norway at the invitation of Hilde Johnson, Norway’s Minister for International Development.

 

His Highness the Aga Khan and Hilde F. Johnson, Minister for International Development, respond to questions at the seminar. The session was moderated by Mr Henrik Syse, Senior Researcher, of the International Peace Research Institute Oslo, PRIO. - Photo: AKDN/Gary Otte
Ismailimail Archives ( April 2005) His Highness the Aga Khan and Hilde F. Johnson, Minister for International Development, respond to questions at the seminar. The session was moderated by Mr Henrik Syse, Senior Researcher, of the International Peace Research Institute Oslo, PRIO. – Photo: AKDN/Gary Otte

The previous day, April 6, 2005, during the signing of the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the Government of Norway and the Aga Khan Development Network (AKDN) of the Ismaili Imamat, His Highness thanked the Government of Norway for its continued collaboration with the AKDN.

“I am very pleased about the partnership that this agreement furthers – a partnership grounded in common principles of human security, conflict prevention, cultural promotion and community development.

 

…This agreement builds on a 20-year long relationship and sets in place a framework for future growth.”

– His Highness Prince Karim Aga Khan,
49th hereditary Imam of the Ismaili Muslims.
Oslo, Norway – April 6th, 2005.


“The Norwegian Government views the Aga Khan Development Network as a “likeminded” development actor. Both believe in democratic governance and empowerment of the poor.

 

We have different strengths and we can play complementary roles. It is through the understanding that local initiatives and central policy making need to connect, that we can contribute to lasting results.”

– Hilde F. Johnson, Norway’s Minister of International Development.
Oslo, Norway – April 6th, 2005.


His Highness the Aga Khan delivers his address entitled, "Democratic Development, Pluralism and Civil Society", at the Norwegian Nobel Institute to an audience of academics, diplomats, civil society leaders, and representatives from the Norwegian government and the private sector. - Photo: AKDN/Gary Otte
Ismailimail Archives ( April 2005) His Highness the Aga Khan delivers his address entitled, “Democratic Development, Pluralism and Civil Society”, at the Norwegian Nobel Institute to an audience of academics, diplomats, civil society leaders, and representatives from the Norwegian government and the private sector. Photo: AKDN/Gary Otte

“I am particularly honoured to be speaking at the Nobel Institute, respected worldwide for its promotion and recognition of exceptional endeavours to reduce human conflict.

 

… My role in human development stems from my position as Imam or spiritual leader of the Shia Ismaili Muslims, as designated by my grandfather in 1957.

 

In all interpretations of Islam, Imams, whether they are Shia or Sunni, are required not only to lead in the interpretation of the faith, but equally to contribute to improving the quality of life of the people who refer to them.

 

It is on this ethical premise, which bridges faith and society, that I established the Aga Khan Development Network. Its multiple agencies and programmes have long been active in many areas of Africa and Asia that are home to some of the poorest and most diverse populations in the world, serving people without regard to their ethnicity, gender or faith.

 

… It is clear that over the next decades, a large number of countries will be designing new constitutions, or refining existing ones, and new regional groupings will come into place. Many young democracies will spawn new political structures. But where are the men and women who will lead?”

– His Highness Prince Karim Aga Khan,
49th hereditary Imam of the Ismaili Muslims.
Nobel Institute: Democratic Development, Pluralism and Civil Society,
Oslo, Norway – April 7th, 2005.

His Highness the Aga Khan is received by Mr Geir Lundestad, Director of the Nobel Institute. - Photo: AKDN/Gary Otte
Ismailimail Archives ( April 2005) His Highness the Aga Khan is received by Mr Geir Lundestad, Director of the Nobel Institute. – Photo: AKDN/Gary Otte

Discover, Explore and Learn more about His Highness the Aga Khan’s visit to Norway in 2005 via the press release jointly issued by the Norwegian Royal Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Aga Khan Development Network (AKDN) at AKDN | Norway and AKDN Strenghten Partnership Through the Signing of a Memorandum of Understanding


Research, Insight & Perspective by A. Maherali













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