Aga Khan Museum wins Urban Vitality Award in recognition of its architectural contribution to GTA and its outstanding relationship to Toronto’s multicultural identity

The Aga Khan Museum, which won the Urban Vitality Award, offers a more concrete contribution to the city — at least in a literal sense.

Yet Henry Kim, the museum’s director, also stressed that it was as much of an ideas as a building.

 

Aga Khan Museum wins Urban Vitality Award from the Canadian Urban Institute
Aga Khan Museum wins Urban Vitality Award from the Canadian Urban Institute

“When people come into a museum they want to be uplifted; they want to get a sense of space, a sense that their whole spirit will be uplifted.

 

We’re not simply a museum that’s a showcase of wonderful objects; we’re a place where we want people to understand that for 1400 years Muslim society has been intertwined with world culture.”

 

– Henry Kim, CEO & Director, Aga Khan Museum

 

In that respect, the theme of the Canadian Urban Institute’s gala was that community is about more than space; walls and infrastructure help in that regard, but the underlying human support structures also make an important contribution.

 

 

Urban Leadership Awards Recognize Contributions That Improve Life in the GTA
November 28, 2016 3:25 pm | by David Rudin

It takes all sorts to make a good city. In the case of Toronto and a great many other cities, some of the contributors are obvious: architects, builders, planners, officials, and committed citizens. That is not an exhaustive list, but discussion tends to focus on the readily identifiable contributors to the urban milieu—people who have their names on things.

There is more to a good city, however, than, that which can easily be quantified. At its Urban Leadership Awards ceremony held last week at Toronto’s Great Hall, the Canadian Urban Institute sought to highlight some of the less discussed contributors to the urban milieu in Canada.

Read the complete story at the source Urban Toronto | Urban Leadership Awards Recognize Contributions That Improve Life in the GTA

Aga Khan Museum wins Urban Vitality Award from the Canadian Urban Institute (Image credit: Urban Toronto)
Aga Khan Museum wins Urban Vitality Award from the Canadian Urban Institute (Image credit: Urban Toronto)

 

Canadian Urban Institute’s 2016 Urban Leadership Award Winners

 

Ratna Omidvar.jpg

The Honourable Ratna Omidvar, C.M., O. Ont., Senator and Distinguished Visiting Professor at Global Diversity Exchange (GDX) at the Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University.

Winner of the Jane Jacobs Lifetime Achievement Award, Senator Omidvar is recognized for her outstanding impact on issues of migration, diversity and inclusion. LEARN MORE

Jane Jacobs Lifetime Achievement Award Indvidual whose vision and passion for cities has had a profound impact on several aspects of urban health over many years.

 

 

Martha Shuttleworth.jpg

Martha J. Shuttleworth, President and Founder of  Neptis Foundation.

Winner of the David Crombie Award, philanthropist Ms. Shuttleworth’s work with Neptis Foundation has revolutionized the way we make decisions in the Toronto region. LEARN MORE

David Crombie Award Individual engaging community, government and private sector partners to help regenerate and enhance the public realm in the Greater Golden Horseshoe. 

 

 

Matthews.jpg

Judy and Wilmot Matthews, head of the Judy and Wilmot Matthews Foundation and urban planner/activist (Mrs. Matthews) and investment banker (Mr. Matthews).

Winner of the City Builder Award, the Matthews have put bold visions in city building together with the resources for implementation. LEARN MORE

City Builder Award Leader whose bold vision and ability to implement change represents true city building. 

 

 

Agazi Afewerki.jpg

Agazi Afewerki, Co-Founder and Director of Youth Empowering Parents (YEP).

Winner of the NextGen Award, Mr. Afewerki mentors, motivates and equips newcomer youth with skills to become mentors to newcomer adults. LEARN MORE

NextGen Award Emerging leader(s) whose work is helping to develop a healthy urban community.

 

 

Aga Khan.jpg

Aga Khan Musuem, winner of the Urban Vitality award for  its spectacular architectural contribution to the City and outstanding relationship to Toronto’s multicultural identity. LEARN MORE

Urban Vitality Award A project or program that demonstrates excellence in creativity, relationship to context and community spirit. 

 

 

All images courtesy of the CUI , from the 2016 Urban Leadership Awards celebration at The Great Hall unless otherwise specified. Click HERE for more photos.

 

 

 

About the Aga Khan Museum

Aga Khan Museum wins Urban Vitality Award from the Canadian Urban Institute
Aga Khan Museum wins Urban Vitality Award from the Canadian Urban Institute

The Aga Khan Museum in Toronto, which is dedicated to presenting an overview of the artistic, intellectual and scientific contributions that Muslim civilizations have made to world heritage, first opened its doors in September of 2014.

The Museum’s Permanent Collection of over 1,000 objects includes masterpieces that reflect a broad range of artistic styles and materials. These portraits, textiles, miniatures, manuscripts, ceramics, tiles, medical texts, books and musical instruments represent more than ten centuries of human history and a geographic area stretching from the Iberian Peninsula to China.

Designed by architect Fumihiko Maki, the Museum shares a 6.8-hectare (17-acre) site with Toronto’s Ismaili Centre, which was designed by architect Charles Correa. The surrounding landscaped park, designed by landscape architect Vladimir Djurovic, serves as an enticing green escape within the city.

For details, visit agakhanmuseum.org

 


Research, Insight & Perspective by A. Maherali


 

 

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