How the City of Mud Stays Standing: Meet the Masons of Djenné, Mali | ArtsIslamica

The story of Djenné, Mali, is typically told through its architecture—monumental mud-brick structures that seem to rise out of the earth like a desert mirage. Every building in Djenné’s historic sector, designated a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1988, has been molded and reinforced by generations of mud masons, following an indigenous tradition as old as the city itself. When Natural History Museum curator Mary … Continue reading How the City of Mud Stays Standing: Meet the Masons of Djenné, Mali | ArtsIslamica

Shahzad Rupani: Once Upon a Life

Writing has been uprooted in Shahzad’s soul since his high school days. Shahzad is from Karachi, Pakistan and works For Jubilee General Insurance as a Management Trainee. Shahzad’s blog represents his thoughts about the mysteries of life, and its simplest form of perspective to see it in an angle a common man sees. His field of study is Risk Management, and writing is his passion. … Continue reading Shahzad Rupani: Once Upon a Life

Tajikistan: A rallying cry

Tajikistan’s poverty is numbing, its roads rotten, the vistas stunning and its people heartbreakingly hospitable, writes Jamie Lafferty. Excerpt: It’s a strange place, Khorog, a settlement of almost 30,000 wedged into a jagged valley peering over the Panj River, the southern border with Afghanistan. Hundreds of kilometres away from any other major town it has absurd luxuries like a university, internet cafes and a perfectly … Continue reading Tajikistan: A rallying cry

Vaqar Ahmed: The city of djinns – Dawn.com

Excerpt: The day I am to return to Pakistan, the Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh and the head of the Agha Khan community, Price Karim Agha Khan are commemorating the completion of the project for the restoration of the Mughal Emperor Humayun’s Tomb. I have visited the tomb a week ago and can attest to the absolutely impeccable renovation work. The buildings have been restored … Continue reading Vaqar Ahmed: The city of djinns – Dawn.com

Blog: Mr. Brown Goes Around – Books on Ismaili History

Blog: Mr. Brown Goes Around - Books on Ismaili HistoryI have a few books to my credit this summer, but I haven’t accomplished as much as my ambitious goals urged me to.  I have finished two books on Ismaili history and thought; one, The Assassins, was not the best; it was written for a popular audience and not as faithful to the facts as I would have liked although I much admire the author, Bernard Lewis.  I read his The Arabs in History summer before last and thought it was wonderful. The much better text on the Ismailis that I read was by Farhad Daftary, Continue reading “Blog: Mr. Brown Goes Around – Books on Ismaili History”

Through the High Pamirs: from Osh to Dushanbe

Through the High Pamirs: from Osh to Dushanbevia theslowwayhome.blogspot.com – After eight days cycling, with one rest day in the village of Murghab, we reached Khorog, the busy riverside town that lies across the water from Afghanistan. The raging Panj river forms much of the Tajik-Afghan border and ultimately joins with the Vakhsh to form Central Asia’s vital artery, the Amu Darya (the Oxus). Continue reading “Through the High Pamirs: from Osh to Dushanbe”

Al-Azhar Park, Cairo | Six Trees

Via http://thesixtrees.com/: With more than its fair share of traffic, overpopulation and pollution, Cairo can be an overwhelming and exhausting place to visit. The city has a shortage of open spaces so when Al-Azhar opened in 2005 it must have come as a huge relief for the city’s inhabitants and visitors.

Al-Azhar Park, Cairo | Six Trees

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Finding Tolerance in Akbar, the Philosopher-King | StudiesIslamica

Finding Tolerance in Akbar, the Philosopher-King | StudiesIslamica
Manuscript of a Mughal Qu’ran in Aga Khan Museum Collection

via StudiesIslamica: Akbar the Great, ruler of most of South Asia in the 16th and early 17th century, rejected bigotry and made unprecedented moves to help non-Muslims feel at peace in his Mughal empire. In reflecting more closely upon his character and conduct, we can see how Akbar’s actions are antithetical to current discrimination and violence against vulnerable religious communities around the world today, especially in Pakistan, a land he once ruled.

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Ismaili Center Dushanbe, Tajikistan | Back to the Bazaar

Ismaili Center | Back to the Bazaar
Ismaili Center Dushanbe Tajikistan

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Ismailis: An Understudied Minority | A Little View of the World

By Morgan Bromhead, United Kingdom – Have you ever heard of the Ismaili’s? If so, do you understand their place within Islam? If your answer is yes to each of these questions you can be considered within the minority in the West. A fact which I consider mind boggling, especially when coupled with the knowledge that they constitute the second largest Shi’a community, after the Twelvers, … Continue reading Ismailis: An Understudied Minority | A Little View of the World

Ricky Shetty blogpost on World Partnership Walk

My elementary school friend Rahim Jivraj invited me to the mobilization session of the annual World Partnership Walk put on by the Aga Khan Foundation Canada. It was inspirational to hear all the powerful stories of how 100% of money raised goes towards ending global poverty (no admin costs whatsoever). The walk started in 1985 right here in our beautiful city and has spread across … Continue reading Ricky Shetty blogpost on World Partnership Walk

Opening soon: Aga Khan Museum, Toronto | ByzBets

Aga Khan Museum will open in Toronto in 2014. The collection will have artworks and artefacts from the Muslim world. Canada’s commitment to pluralism, tolerance and inclusiveness is what attracted the Aga Khan to choose this country and city as the home for the museum. The Aga Khan trust for culture of the Aga Khan Development Network held a foundation ceremony for the museum and neighbouring … Continue reading Opening soon: Aga Khan Museum, Toronto | ByzBets

Aga Khan Foundation Canada | A Pinch of Philanthropy

Many organizations that I have researched are not necessarily looking at the long term impact of their involvement in other countries. The idea that we ‘swoop in’ and implement change can cause issues long term so I think it’s fantastic that the Aga Khan Foundation seeks implementable options that the local communities can continue independently. via Aga Khan Foundation Canada | A Pinch of Philanthropy. Continue reading Aga Khan Foundation Canada | A Pinch of Philanthropy

Imran Hunzai: Ecstasy on the top of Hunza Valley

It was 2:00AM in the morning on the long vacation night so freezing that one wouldn’t even think about exposing any single body part out of sleeping bag. But I did it. I had leave for the Hon Pass with a few friends to see the sun laying its very first rays on the spectacular mountain. Once again, it was so great to be on … Continue reading Imran Hunzai: Ecstasy on the top of Hunza Valley

WORLD PARTNERSHIP WALK TEAM | Change Canada Consultants

In December 2007 I was in New Delhi for the International National Trusts Organization conference.  This conference was attended by over 400 people from around the world and among them was one from Afghanistan, Abdul, who was an employee of the Aga Khan Heritage Trust.  Abdul presented a very interesting and inspiring paper on the value of ‘place’ in a war torn country.  He spoke … Continue reading WORLD PARTNERSHIP WALK TEAM | Change Canada Consultants