Event – October 22 | His Highness Prince Karim Aga Khan to deliver the Keynote Address at ICOMOS 50th Anniversary Conference

His Highness Prince Karim Aga Khan will be delivering the Keynote Address at the conference organised by the International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS) on Thursday, 22 October 2015 in London, England.

Event: Mainstreaming Cultural Heritage: Global Approaches
DATE: Thursday, October 22, 2015
TIME: 10 a.m. London time
VENUE: Arup Headquarters, London W1T

Attendance to the event is by invitation only.

The event will be webcast live on TheIsmaili.org/live and www.AKDN.org starting at 10:00 AM London time and is due to last one hour. His Highness is expected to speak at around 10:15 AM.

Watch it in your local time zone using this time converter – http://www.worldtimebuddy.com

Some of the UK’s renowned cultural heritage sites and landscapes, many of which are UNESCO World Heritage Site. (Images via ICOMOS)
Some of the UK’s renowned cultural heritage sites and landscapes, many of which are UNESCO World Heritage Site. (Images via ICOMOS)

The conference marks the 50th anniversary of the organisation. His Highness is expected to talk about the Aga Khan Development Network’s integrated, multi-sector approach to cultural heritage and development.

Discover, Explore and Learn more via:

ICOMOS-UK & AKDN

Presented by ICOMOS-UK — the United Kingdom national committee of the International Council on Monuments and Sites — the conference marks the 50th anniversary of the organisation with the launch the ICOMOS-UK Cultural Heritage Manifesto.

The International Council on Monuments and Sites has a special role as official adviser to UNESCO on cultural World Heritage Sites. Though the Historic Cities Programme of the Aga Khan Trust for Culture, the AKDN is experienced in leveraging the restoration of historic structures and the creation and rehabilitation of public spaces, parks and gardens as catalysts for social, economic and cultural development.

Cultural heritage is an expression of the ways of living, developed by a community and passed on from generation to generation, including customs, practices, places, objects, artistic expressions and values.

Cultural heritage is often expressed as either intangible or tangible cultural heritage.

– ICOMOS, 2002

Cultural Heritage Manifesto

Cultural heritage has a profound impact on our lives, but it is vulnerable, highly vulnerable, as we have seen so vividly in recent times in Syria, Yemen and Mali.

In its 50th anniversary year, ICOMOS-UK calls for a new approach to the way we all sustain, promote and benefit from cultural heritage.

  • Cultural heritage must be seen as a cross cutting theme, embedded in all aspects of human activity and sustainable development.
  • It must be acknowledged as a key source of resilience for communities and wider society.
  • The profile of cultural heritage should be enhanced as a major economic activity comparable to those of the natural environment or the arts.

“Cultural Heritage provides a sense of continuity with our forebears and is an important part of providing that feeling of stability and security which we would all like.

I warmly commend the Cultural Heritage Manifesto; it is a key step in promoting cultural heritage as a major industry that delivers substantial economic as well as spiritual benefits, and as a key consideration in the development decisions we take.”

– HRH The Duke of Gloucester KG GCVO, Patron, ICOMOS-UK

Other leading heritage speakers will include Dame Fiona Reynolds, Master of Emmanuel College, Cambridge, and Erminia Sciacchitano, Policy Officer, Culture, Heritage, Economy of Culture at the European Union. The conference will be opened by HRH The Duke of Gloucester KG GCVO, Patron of ICOMOS-UK.

During the conference, delegates will have the opportunity to debate actions to implement the Manifesto’s aims over the next five years. ICOMOS-UK will be taking forward the Manifesto through its unique position as the UK arm of an international mission to promote and support best practice in the conservation, care and understanding of the historic environment.

“Cultural heritage is part of who we are, both individually and collectively, and has a profound impact on lives; but to deliver its full potential in guiding sustainable development, cultural heritage must be a cross-cutting theme, embedded in all the plans and policies that guide that development.”

– Susan Denyer, Secretary, ICOMOS-UK

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